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THE OILY BEDHOPPER'S BOOK OF TRIVIA

From aardvarks to zombies, herein lies the secret to the meaning of life (no…it’s not 42), just an amazing collection of vignettes to intrigue, amuse and titillate you.

This concoction of intelligent trivia (this is possibly an oxymoron) will not only educate you, but can be used to host trivia parties or to bamboozle friends and family alike.

In Store Price: $33.95 
Online Price:   $30.95

ISBN: 978-1-921574-83-2  
Format: B5 Paperback
Number of pages:247
Genre: Non Fiction
 

 


 

Author: Malcolm Halket and Robin O'Sullivan
Publisher: Zeus Publications
Date Published: 2010
Language: English

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ABOUT THE AUTHORS

 

Malcolm Halket

Born in Melbourne in 1952 and not off-planet as has been alleged by some, Malcolm Halket is a 1.97m tall baby boomer civil engineer who now resides in Brisbane with wife Debra and two children, Clint and Natasha, and cat Benson. He has designed and built stuff (e.g. wharves, jetties, bridges, nickel processing plants, roads, tension membrane structures, pipelines, buildings, marinas) in eight different countries (Thailand, Jamaica, Australia, India, England, Indonesia, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia).

 

Through genealogical investigation, Malcolm’s ancestry has been found to be: 

 

  • 50% Scottish e.g. William Wallace, Rob Roy MacGregor
  • 20% Irish e.g. James Joyce, Michael Collins
  • 10% French e.g. Claude Monet, Gustav Eiffel
  • 10% German e.g. Martin Luther, Albert Einstein
  • 10% English e.g. Isambard Brunel, Oliver Cromwell

 

but remains always 100% Australian, e.g. Keith Miller, John Howard, Les Patterson, John Monash et al. 

A DNA analysis shows that 85% Celtic and 15% Viking blood is coursing through his veins. Let this put to rest all the rumours of extra-terrestrial ancestry once and for all. QED. 

The sense of humour is possibly a Viking trait finely honed along with their swords as they pillaged Europe and discussed philosophy, religion and the well-being of the world’s underprivileged at night during the harsh winters whilst scoffing ale. Maybe. 

Malcolm is a prolific reader who enjoys gardening, travelling business class, building stuff, walking, the odd red wine, and he believes passionately in private enterprise and strives ceaselessly for world peace and a cure for cancer.

 

Robin O’Sullivan

Born in Cork in 1948 and clearly the older, wiser and infinitely more psychologically stable member of the trivial duo, Robin O’Sullivan is an academic who fled the rigours of the harsh Irish winter and the folk memory of those dreadful Viking raids, and now resides in Bahrain where by an unprecedented stroke of mutual ill-fortune he met Malcolm. In that sunny oasis of tranquillity they saved the global wine industry from recession, measured out the pages of this little book with mighty tankards of the noble juice, and distilled the many themes it contains from a great fog of circumlocution which grew all the larger with every bottle they opened. 

Robin is married to Marian and has three children, Emma, Philip and Robert, who collectively and emphatically subscribe to the theory that the world would be a far better place if there were fewer books of dubious quality in it.  

When not discussing ever more ludicrous topics for quiz questions, Robin manifests an interest in architecture. Consequently, as Malcolm so eloquently puts it, he likes building stuff and has more half-finished castles in the air to his credit than most neurotics. He also enjoys reading and photography, and disapproves of Oliver Cromwell with an intensity that King Charles the First would understand and appreciate. He urges you to buy this book now. Better still, buy extra copies for all your friends and write letters to newspapers praising it. It will bring you happiness.

Here's a sample of the book:

A FAREWELL TO ARMS

 

1.         Who wrote the novel A Farewell to Arms?

ERNEST HEMINGWAY

 

2.         In 1888 the Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh cut off the lower part of his left ear, and in the following year painted one of his best-known pictures which is commemorated in Don McLean’s 1971 ballad ‘Vincent’. What is the name of the painting?

            THE STARRY NIGHT

 

3.         There are about 80 species of legless lizard known to science, excluding the lounge lizard which is only intermittently legless. Legless lizards and snakes can usually be distinguished by their eyelids. What is distinctive about a snake’s eyelids?

SNAKES DON’T HAVE MOVABLE EYELIDS

 

4.         Two of Henry VIII’s wives had their heads cut off for alleged adultery and other misdemeanours. Anne Boleyn was the first. Who was the second?

CATHERINE HOWARD

 

5.         Although Lord Nelson won a resounding victory, the devotion to duty of the French commander was noteworthy. Having lost both legs to a cannonball early in the action, appropriately tourniqueted and propped in a chair, he continued to direct the fleet until killed when his burning flagship exploded. What was the name of that battle?

            THE BATTLE OF THE NILE (or THE BATTLE OF ABOUKIR BAY)

 

6.         What is the name of the disembodied hand featured in The Addams Family?

            THING

 

7.         Following a close encounter with grapeshot, Wellington’s second-in-command at Waterloo famously remarked, ‘By Gad, Sir, I’ve lost my leg!’ to which Wellington responded, ‘By Gad, Sir! So you have!’ Who was that second-in-command?

HENRY PAGET, LORD UXBRIDGE. (Later, the Marquess of Anglesey)

 

8.         In 1993 Mrs Lorena Bobbitt achieved notoriety for undertaking an amputation despite lacking an appropriate surgical qualification. Her husband’s first names were the name of a famous American film star. What actor was he named after?

            JOHN WAYNE

 

9.         A Las Vegas legend tells of a leper who, on losing to an opponent holding five cards that beat his three of a kind, threw in his hand. In the standard ranking system used in poker, what comes immediately above three of a kind?

A STRAIGHT (= five cards in sequence, in more than one suit)

 

10.        A well-known character in the novel Peter Pan suffered years of insomnia from having to use a sleeping bag manufactured by the French company Lacoste. Who was he?

CAPTAIN HOOK
 

A LOAD OF BULL

 

1.                  The largest bull in the world is called ‘Chilli’ and it weighs 1.25 tonnes and stands 2 metres high at the shoulder. What breed is it?

FRIESIAN

 

2.                  In Greek mythology, what creature was a cross between a bull and a human?

MINOTAUR

 

3.                  The heaviest bulldozer now made is a Komatsu with the designation D575A, weighing in at a whopping 150t. Which company makes the second heaviest bulldozer at 100t?

CATERPILLAR

 

4.                  In recent years, many attacks on humans and their pets have been attributed to what dog breed that was initially bred to fight other dogs?

PIT BULL TERRIER

 

5.                  In the classical world, statues of which goddess, who was particularly associated with the town of Ephesus in Turkey, were adorned with rows of bull’s testicles?

DIANA

 

6.                  What is the meaning of the Spanish wine ‘Sangre de Toro’?

BULL’S BLOOD

 

7.                  In 1932, who wrote Death in the Afternoon, a non-fiction work about bull fighting in Spain?

ERNEST HEMINGWAY

 

8.                  Which notable politician made his maiden speech in the House of Commons in 1983, proudly declaring himself a socialist?

TONY BLAIR

 

9.                  ‘No, I was not with Mrs O’Leary in the barn at the time!’ exclaimed the plaintiff. ‘The cow must have knocked over the candle by accident.’ What 1871 North American incident lay behind the accusation?

THE GREAT FIRE OF CHICAGO

 

10.              Rocky Mountain Oysters or Prairie Oysters are euphemisms for what culinary delight?

BULL’S TESTICLES

A STITCH IN TIME

 

1.                  What is Dr Who’s occupation?

TIME LORD

 

2.                  Who wrote A Brief History of Time?

STEPHEN HAWKING

 

3.                  The history monks appear in the book The Thief of Time written by which popular British author of fantasy novels?

TERRY PRATCHETT

 

4.                  Who sang ‘The Times They are a’Changing’ in 1964?

BOB DYLAN

 

5.                  The statement ‘Time gentlemen, please!’ is usually said when?

THE PUB IS CLOSING

 

6.                  What device is ‘Father Time’, the personification of time, said to carry with him?

AN HOURGLASS

 

7.                  Which folk singer, who died in a plane crash in 1973, released the song ‘Time in a Bottle’?

JIM CROCE

 

8.                  Russia has 8 time zones, compared to 5 for USA and 3 in Australia. How many does China have?

ONE

 

9.                  Which American Native Indian Chief is renowned for saying ‘It’s a good time to die’ in 1877, after defeating Custer, then surrendering, only to be murdered by the US Army?

CRAZY HORSE

 

10.              TIME is a weekly news magazine that started publication in 1923 in America. By use of a ‘backronym’ (changing the facts after the event) the magazine’s advertising section claims the initials mean what?

THE INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE OF EVENTS


 

AGRICULTURE

 

1.         In 1701 who invented the seed drill, revolutionising the planting of crops and whose name was adopted by a British rock band in the 1970’s?

JETHRO TULL

 

2.         In which country in 1834 did Hiram Moore develop the first combine harvester which was drawn by 16 horses?

USA

 

3.         In 1935 in Australia, what animal was introduced from Brazil to eat sugar cane beetles, but failed to eat the beetles and has become an unstoppable scourge?

CANE TOAD

 

4.         Although the first plough was invented thousands of years BC, it was not until 1837 that the first steel plough was invented by a person who went on to become famous for the manufacture of farm tractors. Who was he?

JOHN DEERE

 

5.         The first artificial fertiliser was made by German chemist Justus von Liebig in 1840, but English chemist John Lawes in 1842 developed what famous fertiliser to vastly increase crop yields worldwide?

SUPER PHOSPHATE

 

6.         During the 1840s what crop failure caused famine in Ireland, leading to mass starvation and emigration?

POTATO

 

7.         In Australia in 1878 what did Richard Smith do to the plough to make it more efficient and less prone to damage?

INVENTED THE STUMP-JUMP PLOUGH

 

8.         Immortalised on the Australian $2 bank note, who developed in 1901 ‘Federation Wheat’, the first strain of wheat to combat the disease rust?

WILLIAM FARRER

 

9.         Name the English engineer who pioneered the use of steam engines for ploughing fields (especially muddy ones) during the 1850s?

JOHN FOWLER

 

10.        In 1926, biological control was successfully used in Australia when the Cactoblastis Moth destroyed an infestation of what plant which had been inadvertently released by English settlers?

PRICKLY PEAR CACTUS

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